My favourite “motivational speech” for the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birthday.

"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more;

Or close the wall up with our English dead.

In peace there’s nothing so becomes a man

As modest stillness and humility:

But when the blast of war blows in our ears,

Then imitate the action of the tiger;

Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,

Disguise fair nature with hard-favour’d rage;

Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;

Let pry through the portage of the head

Like the brass cannon; let the brow o’erwhelm it

As fearfully as doth a galled rock

O’erhang and jutty his confounded base,

Swill’d with the wild and wasteful ocean.

Now set the teeth and stretch the nostril wide,

Hold hard the breath and bend up every spirit

To his full height. On, on, you noblest English.

Whose blood is fet from fathers of war-proof!

Fathers that, like so many Alexanders,

Have in these parts from morn till even fought

And sheathed their swords for lack of argument:

Dishonour not your mothers; now attest

That those whom you call’d fathers did beget you.

Be copy now to men of grosser blood,

And teach them how to war. And you, good yeoman,

Whose limbs were made in England, show us here

The mettle of your pasture; let us swear

That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not;

For there is none of you so mean and base,

That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.

I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,

Straining upon the start. The game’s afoot:

Follow your spirit, and upon this charge

Cry ‘God for Harry, England, and Saint George!”

Henry V

Shame on me! I almost forgot how much I love James McAvoy.

Source x

“I have been told that they make love to whomever they chose, and that the idea of fidelity is utterly strange to them.”

“They have … a different morality to us.”

“Is it not more natural?”

“I … I would only say that it is different.”

“How boring you are.”

Poor Athelstan.

Q&A with X-Men: Days Of Future Past stars Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender and James McAvoy.

I could listen to James McAvoy speaking with his scottish accent forever

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"Loki, that’s me. Loki, the Light-Bringer, the misunderstood, the elusive, the handsome and modest hero of this particular tissue of lies."

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"Take it with a pinch of salt, but it’s at least as true as the official version and, dare I say it, more entertaining. So far, history, such as it is, has cast me in a rather unflattering role. Now it’s my turn to take the stage.
Let
     there
          be
               light.”

Reading this novel imagining Tom Hiddleston/Loki telling it it’s much more fun.

“They say Brits play the best villains, but what makes a great villain? Firstly, you need to sound distinct. To speak with an eloquence that lets everyone know who’s in charge. A villain should have style. A suit should always be bespoke, razor-sharp like your wit. It’s important that a villain has the means to stay one step ahead. World domination starts with an attention to detail. Take this tiny switch for example, it changes everything. Now brace yourselves.

This happy breed of men, this little world,

This precious stone set in the silver sea,

Against the envy of less happier lands,

This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.

It’s all mine”

Tom Hiddleston reciting Shakespeare’s Richard II 
The car? Didn’t notice.

 

"I’m just not very good with violence." — Charles Xavier
X-Men: Days of Future Past | Official Trailer 3 [>]

Best scene (^_^)

(via beauxtiful)

Super Awesome! I can’t wait!

Shakespeare’s poetry is like a labyrinth, and his verse is so full of twists and turns, which at first can seem confusing, and befuddling, and intimidating. But if in preparation on your own you’ve worked out a route from the outside to the center and you know that you have to take this turn, and then this turn, and then go around the back of this, and then come back in this way, if you, as the actor, know the way through the labyrinth, you can lead other people faster and with clarity and fun.

Best description of Shakespeare’s poetry and acting ever.